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OW New English » The aroma of Wine

In professional wine tasting, there is generally a distinction made between "aromas" and a wine's "bouquet" while in casual wine tasting these two terms are used interchangeably. An aroma refers to the smells unique to the and are most readily demonstrated in a wine—such as with or with . These are smells that are commonly associated with a young wine. As a wine ages, chemical reactions among , , and create new smells that are known as a wine's bouquet. These can include in an aged or in a . The term bouquet can also be expanded to include the smells derived from fermentation and exposure to . In Burgundy, the aromas of wines are sub-divided into three categories-primary, secondary and tertiary aromas. Primary aromas are those specific to the grape variety itself. Secondary aromas are those derived from fermentation and oak aging. Tertiary aromas are those that develop through bottled aging.

In professional wine tasting, there is generally a distinction made between "aromas" and a wine's "bouquet" while in casual wine tasting these two terms are used interchangeably. An aroma refers to the smells unique to the and are most readily demonstrated in a wine—such as with or with . These are smells that are commonly associated with a young wine. As a wine ages, chemical reactions among , , and create new smells that are known as a wine's bouquet. These can include in an aged or in a . The term bouquet can also be expanded to include the smells derived from fermentation and exposure to . In Burgundy, the aromas of wines are sub-divided into three categories-primary, secondary and tertiary aromas. Primary aromas are those specific to the grape variety itself. Secondary aromas are those derived from fermentation and oak aging. Tertiary aromas are those that develop through bottled aging.

The Aroma of Christ - Flowing Faith

aroma character of white noble grapes

The sense of smell and detecting the aromas in wine is the primary means through which wine is tasted and evaluated. Prior to tasting the wine, wine drinkers will often smell the wine in the glass. Large bowl glasses with tapered openings, some of which are specifically designed to enhance aromatics of different wines, can assist in capturing more aromatics within the glass for the drinker to detect. Wines served at warmer temperature will be more aromatic than wine served cooler due to heat's ability to increase the volatility of aromatic compounds in the wine. Swirling, or aerating, the wine will increase available surface area, increasing the rate at which aroma molecules volatilize. Some subtle aromatics can be overwhelmed by more dominant aromatics that arise after swirling, so most professional tasters will sniff the wine briefly first before swirling. The closer the nose is to the wine, even right inside the glass, the greater chances of aromatics being captured. A series of short, quick sniffs versus one long inhale will also maximize the likelihood of aromatics being detected. The human nose starts to "fatigue" after around six seconds and so a pause may be needed between sniffs.

Learn how those exposed to the aroma of roasted coffee beans exhibited near-normal levels of "messenger molecules" in the brain in this medical report.