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Charles Mingus And Friends In Concert (1973)

Charles Mingus Wallpaper 2307x2958 Charles, Mingus

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Charles Mingus, Paris 1964. Photo by Guy Le Querrec

Charlie Mingus - Live

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Blues & Roots

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Charles Mingus Jr. (April 22, 1922 – January 5, 1979)

Considering the number of compositions that Charles Mingus wrote, his works have not been recorded as often as comparable jazz composers. The only Mingus tribute albums recorded during his lifetime were baritone saxophonist 's album, , in 1963, and 's album , in 1979. Of all his works, his elegant elegy for , "" (from ) has probably had the most recordings. Besides recordings from the expected jazz artists, the song has also been recorded by musicians as disparate as , , , and and with and without . sang a version with lyrics that she wrote for the song.

Few musicians brought as much passion to jazz as Charles Mingus (1922-1979). You can hear it all over his music in every period: the power, the lyricism, and the sheer propulsion. He loved independent melody lines interwoven in raucous counterpoint and infused with the emotional power of the sanctified church. As bass player he had few peers, in terms of agility, a big sound, and percussive plucking; his tender, singing work with a bow reflected…

Charles Mingus at the Monterey Jazz Festival, September 20, 1964

Charles Mingus - Moanin' - YouTube

Few musicians brought as much passion to jazz as Charles Mingus (1922-1979). You can hear it all over his music in every period: the power, the lyricism, and the sheer propulsion. He loved independent melody lines interwoven in raucous counterpoint and infused with the emotional power of the sanctified church. As bass player he had few peers, in terms of agility, a big sound, and percussive plucking; his tender, singing work with a bow reflected…

is considered one of Charles Mingus's masterpieces. The composition is 4,235 measures long, requires two hours to perform, and is one of the longest jazz pieces ever written. was only completely discovered, by musicologist Andrew Homzy, during the cataloging process after his death. With the help of a grant from the , the score and instrumental parts were copied, and the piece itself was premiered by a 30-piece orchestra, conducted by . This concert was produced by Mingus's widow, Sue Graham Mingus, at Alice Tully Hall on June 3, 1989, ten years after his death. It was performed again at several concerts in 2007. The performance at Walt Disney Concert Hall is available on . The complete score was published in 2008 by Hal Leonard.