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God Found Us You (Harperblessings)

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God Found Us You; God Found Us You Lisa Tawn Bergren, Laura J

As parents, however, we must be willing to see – and help them articulate – the pain of our children as it surfaces. Sometimes the expressions of grief will surface at unexpected times. For example, the other day I was reading my children a book entitled God Found Us You, by Lisa Bergren and Laura Bryant (HarperCollins).

As parents, however, we must be willing to see – and help them articulate – the pain of our children as it surfaces. Sometimes the expressions of grief will surface at unexpected times. For example, the other day I was reading my children a book entitled God Found Us You, by Lisa Bergren and Laura Bryant (HarperCollins).

If you're looking for an adoption version, check out GOD FOUND US YOU

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    When I first read “God Found Us You” on my own, I did find it a tad touchy-feely. Must Mama Fox keep going on and on about how special Little Fox is? Shouldn’t he already know that by now? my stoic Asian brain cells thought to themselves. However, I did get this book long before C. talked. Reading it to him now, I realise that he is very curious to know what Mama Fox is thinking about all the time. So yes, even if this story is quite tedious to read aloud, I’m really happy C. has found an adoption story (besides Squirky!) that he enjoys.

    In this story about adoption, a little white fox asks his rust-colored mama, "tell me again about the day I came home." She begins by describing how she dreamed of holding him in her arms. Seeing other mothers with their babies, she explains, made her lonely, so she prayed and waited patiently for God to answer her prayers. Little Fox wonders why he couldn't stay with the mother who had him, and Mama assures him that "she must have had very big reasons to give you up." Little Fox's mother promises to be his "forever mama," and tells him she will always celebrate "the day that God found us you." After she tucks him in, Little Fox says his prayers and falls into a contented sleep to dream about the day he came to his cozy home in the big woods. Bryant's delicate illustrations in pastel shades augment the heartfelt message of Bergren's simple story. Scenic paintings portray the loving relationship between Mama Fox and her child, and are framed with decorative flowers, vines, and stars. This woodland tale answers many questions adopted children may ask their parents. Rose Lewis's (Little, Brown, 2002) is a more traditional story on the subject.-