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Homeschooling inthe United States

Homeschooling in the United States: 'How To' Guide for Everyone - Beginners to Veterans

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Homeschooling in the United States

Princiotta, Daniel, Stacey Bielick, and Chris Chapman. “1.1 Million Homeschooled Students in the United States in 2003. Issue Brief. NCES 2004-115.” National Center for Education Statistics (2004).

Princiotta, Daniel, Stacey Bielick, and Chris Chapman. “1.1 Million Homeschooled Students in the United States in 2003. Issue Brief. NCES 2004-115.” National Center for Education Statistics (2004).

History of homeschooling in the United States

 
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501(c)(4) nonprofit organizations > Home School Legal Defense Association

Conservatism in the United States > Home School Legal Defense Association

Legal advocacy organizations in the United States > Home School Legal Defense Association

Organizations established in 1983 > Home School Legal Defense Association

Christian education > Home School Legal Defense Association

Homeschooling in the United States > Home School Legal Defense Association

Non-profit organizations based in Purcellville, Virginia > Home School Legal Defense Association

Political organizations in the United States > Home School Legal Defense Association

HOMESCHOOLING IN THE UNITED STATES REVELATION OR REVOLUTION

Princiotta, Daniel, Stacey Bielick, and Chris Chapman. “1.1 Million Homeschooled Students in the United States in 2003. Issue Brief. NCES 2004-115.” National Center for Education Statistics (2004).

To start, I searched the terms “homeschooling in the united states” on Google Scholar, which led me to a number of studies by the National Household Education Surveys Program that involved collecting data about homeschooling in the United States. These sources provided some statistical data concerning the number of students in the United States being homeschooled in a given year, and the percentage of all U.S. students that they constitute. My next search, “current homeschooling rates,” was not quite as successful. It proved far more difficult for me to find information about current rates of homeschooling in the United States. In fact, many of the sources I found with data about home schooling did not discuss information that was current at the time they were published: for example, one work was published in 2001 and referred to 1999 statistics.