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3) Livy The History of Rome 1.5

The History of Rome, Books 01 to 08

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It took the Roman historian Livy (d

At Patavium, there was a well-known prophet called Gaius Cornelius, who was a fellow-citizen and acquaintance of Livy the historian. On the day of the battle this man happened to be sitting at his prophetic work and first, according to Livy, he realized that the battle was taking place at that very moment and said to those who were present that now was the time when matters were being decided and now the troops were going into action; then he had a second look and, when he had examined the signs, he jumped up in a kind of ecstasy and cried out: 'Caesar, the victory is yours!' Those who were standing by were amazed at him, but he took the garland from his head and solemnly swore that he would not wear it again until facts had proved that his arts had revealed the truth to him. Livy, certainly, is most emphatic that this really happened.

Livy sees history as something that one has to lay out in a manner for everyone to see. Within the basis of his records, he shows that you will find examples and warnings that one can apply personally. Even though he had great patriotism in his country, and believed that they were not opulent but still the greatest, he had a fundamental outlook of what it was like to be Roman in Book 5, particullarly in the religious and moral character that a Roman should adhere to. Livy firmy believes in the points ne made of justice, fidelity and propriety in the waging of war are characteristics the Romans always showed. Also by the end of book 5 Livy shows the when Romans veered from the religious practices and differed from the gods themselves, things went badly for the Romans. We see everything crumble for the Romans when they do not follow their gods, from the exil of Camillus to their bad discipline on the battlefield.

17 AD) forty years to write his 142-book History of Rome

  • Livy on the Founding of Rome - Section from Livy Roman History on the Found...
  • Roman Senate and Senators According to Livy
  • Livy Roman History
  • Periods of History in Ancient Rome.
  • Ancient Rome

History of Rome, Volume XI — Livy | Harvard University Press

Nevertheless, the accounts of Rome's early history are for the most part contradictory and therefore suspect (in this view). Seeley says, "It is when Livy's account is compared with the accounts of other writers that we become aware of the utter uncertainty which prevailed among the Romans themselves.... The traditional history, as a whole, must be rejected...." As Livy stated that he used what he found without passing judgement on his sources (which is not quite true, as he does on occasion pass judgement), attacks on the credibility of Livy typically begin with the annalists. Opinions vary. T.J. Cornell presumes that Livy relied on "unscrupulous annalists" who "did not hesitate to invent a series of face-saving victories." Furthermore, "The annalists of the first century BC are thus seen principally as entertainers...." Cornell does not follow this view consistently, as he is willing to accept Livy as history for the 4th and 3rd centuries BC. A more positive view of the same limitations was given by Howard:

Nevertheless, the accounts of Rome's early history are for the most part contradictory and therefore suspect (in this view). Seeley says, "It is when Livy's account is compared with the accounts of other writers that we become aware of the utter uncertainty which prevailed among the Romans themselves.... The traditional history, as a whole, must be rejected...." As Livy stated that he used what he found without passing judgement on his sources (which is not quite true, as he does on occasion pass judgement), attacks on the credibility of Livy typically begin with the annalists. Opinions vary. T.J. Cornell presumes that Livy relied on "unscrupulous annalists" who "did not hesitate to invent a series of face-saving victories." Furthermore, "The annalists of the first century BC are thus seen principally as entertainers...." Cornell does not follow this view consistently, as he is willing to accept Livy as history for the 4th and 3rd centuries BC. A more positive view of the same limitations was given by Howard: