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Marguerite de Navarre (French: , , or ),

The Heptameron (Penguin Classics)

$18.00


Marguerite de Navarre 1492-1549

Marguerite de Navarre (: , ; 11 April 1492 – 21 December 1549), also known as Marguerite of Angoulême and Margaret of Navarre, was the of , of , and Duchess of and . She was married to . Her brother became King of , as , and the two siblings were responsible for the celebrated intellectual and cultural court and salons of their day in France.

Marguerite de Navarre (: , ; 11 April 1492 – 21 December 1549), also known as Marguerite of Angoulême and Margaret of Navarre, was the of , of , and Duchess of and . She was married to . Her brother became King of , as , and the two siblings were responsible for the celebrated intellectual and cultural court and salons of their day in France.

"Francis I and Marguerite de Navarre" by Richard Parkes Bonington

  • Olga Anna Duhl (Hrsg.): Quêtes spirituelles et actualités contemporaines dans le théâtre de Marguerite de Navarre (= Renaissance and Reformation, Band 26, Nr. 4). Canadian Society for Renaissance Studies, Toronto 2002
  • Marguerite de Navarre par , (vers 1530)

    Following the expulsion of and from Geneva in 1538, Marguerite de Navarre wrote to , a notable reformer in Geneva. The two women appear to have personal history outside of their written correspondence: Marguerite was godmother to the daughter of Marie Dentière and Dentière's daughter composed a French guide to the Hebrew language to send to Marguerite's daughter. In her letter, Marguerite inquired what was the cause for Calvin and Farel's expulsion. Dentière responded in 1539 with the , commonly known today as the . This epistle criticized the Protestant clergy who had expelled Calvin and Farel, asked for Marguerite's support and aid in increasing scriptural literacy and access among women, and advised her to act in expelling Catholic clergy from France.

    Following the expulsion of and from Geneva in 1538, Marguerite de Navarre wrote to , a notable reformer in Geneva. The two women appear to have personal history outside of their written correspondence: Marguerite was godmother to the daughter of Marie Dentière and Dentière's daughter composed a French guide to the Hebrew language to send to Marguerite's daughter. In her letter, Marguerite inquired what was the cause for Calvin and Farel's expulsion. Dentière responded in 1539 with the , commonly known today as the . This epistle criticized the Protestant clergy who had expelled Calvin and Farel, asked for Marguerite's support and aid in increasing scriptural literacy and access among women, and advised her to act in expelling Catholic clergy from France.