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After some time,people made it in films and made computer games with a background story of El Cid.

El Cid [VHS]

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Age of Empires 2 - The story of El Cid

El Cid Colada Sword

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El Cid contado a los niños (Biblioteca escolar: Clásicos contados a los niños) (Spanish Edition)

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El Cid - National Hero of Spain - Rodrigo Diaz de Vivar

"Entertaining, amazing history! This is the true story of El Cid, and there are many beautiful illustrations in the book. Rodrigo Diaz, the Cid, was a Catholic knight, and the book is written from that perspective. Your children will love the heroes in the book, who are a role model they can look up to. This book is currently in use by several Catholic home schools, as El Cid epitomizes the moral virtues that are all but lost in today's society. My family highly recommends this book to anyone with children."

In legend the story of El Cid and the reconquest has acquired a rather simple plot of Christian Spain against Muslim Moors but throughout this period the situation in Iberia was much more intricate. As well as fighting against each other Christian and Muslim rulers commonly fought amongst themselves, the Berbers of North Africa, who had provided the bulk of the invading armies, clashed with the fundamentalist Arab leadership from the Middle East and to further complicate matters interfaith alliances were not unusual. The fighting along the Christian Muslim frontier was punctuated by prolonged periods of peace and truces and distorting the situation even further were mercenaries who frequently switched sides and fought for cash.

With Charlton Heston, Sophia Loren, Raf Vallone, Geneviève Page

  • Simon Barton and Richard Fletcher. The world of El Cid, Chronicles of the Spanish reconquest. Manchester: University Press, 2000. ISBN 0-7190-5225-4 hardback, ISBN 0-7190-5226-2 paperback.
  • Gonzalo Martínez Díez, "El Cid Histórico: Un Estudio Exhaustivo Sobre el Verdadero Rodrigo Díaz de Vivar", Editorial Planeta (Spain, June 1999). ISBN 84-08-03161-9
  • C. Melville and A. Ubaydli (ed. and trans.), Christians and Moors in Spain, vol. III, Arabic sources (711–1501). (Warminster, 1992).
  • Joseph F. O'Callaghan. A History of Medieval Spain. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1975
  • Peter Pierson. The History of Spain. Ed. John E. Findling and Frank W. Thacheray. Wesport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 1999. 34–36.
  • Bernard F. Reilly. The Kingdom of León-Castilla under King Alfonso VI, 1065–1109 Princeton, New Jersey: University Press, 1988.
  • Steven Thomas. 711–1492: Al-Andalus and the Reconquista.
  • M. J. Trow,El Cid The Making of a Legend, Sutton Publishing Limited, 2007.
  • Henry Edwards Watts. "The Story of El Cid (1026–1099)" in The Christian Recovery of Spain: The Story of Spain from the Moorish Conquest to the Fall of Grenada (711–1492 AD). New York: Putnam, 1894. 71–91.
  • T.Y. Henderson. "Conquests Of Valencia"
  • J. I. Garcia Alonso, J. A. Martinez, A. J. Criado, "Origin of El Cid's sword revealed by ICP-MS metal analysis", Spectroscopy Europe, 11/4 (1999).

The fabled Spanish hero Rodrigo Diaz (a.k.a

In legend the story of El Cid and the reconquest has acquired a rather simple plot of Christian Spain against Muslim Moors but throughout this period the situation in Iberia was much more intricate. As well as fighting against each other Christian and Muslim rulers commonly fought amongst themselves, the Berbers of North Africa, who had provided the bulk of the invading armies, clashed with the fundamentalist Arab leadership from the Middle East and to further complicate matters interfaith alliances were not unusual. The fighting along the Christian Muslim frontier was punctuated by prolonged periods of peace and truces and distorting the situation even further were mercenaries who frequently switched sides and fought for cash.

In our time when Muslim and Christian find themselves at odds, the story of El Cid and his Muslim allies defending Spain against the incursions of the North African fundamentalists, known in history as the Almoravids, can teach us a very important lesson. As asserted in the movie's very first scene, the fanatical Almoravids were bent on destroying the Muslims who wrote poetry, studied philosophy and developed science and math in order to assert a "purist" form of the Islamic religion.