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The Amulet of Samarkand (The Bartimaeus Trilogy, Book 1)

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The Amulet of Samarkand is an extremely potent magical artifact

Nathaniel, a magician's apprentice, is working way out of his league when he calls up the djinni, Bartimaeus, to steal the Amulet of Samarkand from the powerful magician Simon Lovelace.

Half the story is told by a djinni, Bartimeus, who is summoned by an 11-year-old apprentice and commanded to steal the Amulet of Samarkand from an unscrupulous government minister. Bartimeus's efforts to follow his orders and, later, to deal with the consequences, while resenting every moment of his adventures, have you on the edge of your seat. His narrative is splendidly amplified by footnotes that add historical depth, wry humour and smug pride to his already packed story.

THE AMULET OF SAMARKAND - Bartimaeus Sequence

Author: Jonathan Stroud
Publisher: Jakarta : Gramedia Pustaka Utama, 2007.
Edition/Format:  Print book : Fiction : Juvenile audience : Indonesian : Cet. 1
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Nathaniel, a magician's apprentice, summons up the djinni Bartimaeus and instructs him to steal the Amulet of Samarkand from the powerful magician Simon Lovelace.
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Subjects
  • Magic -- Juvenile fiction.
  • Wizards -- Juvenile fiction.
  • Apprentices -- Juvenile fiction.
  • View all subjects
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THE AMULET OF SAMARKAND (2003) Where it all began

We learn about this world largely from Bartimaeus himself. His first-person narration comprises about half of The Amulet of Samarkand. He speaks with snark-filled disdain of the tiresome magicians who summon him to do ridiculous tasks. He also shares bits of inside information about magical beings and about the history of this alternate version of our own world. In the print book, much of this information is in footnotes (a device I happen to adore), but in the audio, they’re just presented as part of the narration. (I had no idea there were footnotes until I happened to pick up a copy in a bookstore, and on looking at the notes, I realized that the information is incorporated into the audiobook, but it’s done seamlessly.)

We learn about this world largely from Bartimaeus himself. His first-person narration comprises about half of The Amulet of Samarkand. He speaks with snark-filled disdain of the tiresome magicians who summon him to do ridiculous tasks. He also shares bits of inside information about magical beings and about the history of this alternate version of our own world. In the print book, much of this information is in footnotes (a device I happen to adore), but in the audio, they’re just presented as part of the narration. (I had no idea there were footnotes until I happened to pick up a copy in a bookstore, and on looking at the notes, I realized that the information is incorporated into the audiobook, but it’s done seamlessly.)