Home

Dan Simmons - The Fall of Hyperion

The Fall of Hyperion

$7.99


The Fall of Hyperion - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Hyperion and The Fall of Hyperion, by , are one strange, fascinating story in two volumes. I hope that Jo Walton decides to re-read it when she comes to it in her blog series on the website (Hyperion won a Hugo and The Fall of Hyperion was nominated).

I’d never heard of Dan Simmons before and I have no idea why. Hyperion and The Fall of Hyperion are very unique, both in setting and structure. Simmons accomplishes this by blending together a lot of disparate elements. Although they’re ostensibly sf, sometimes it’s hard to tell whether I’m reading an sf, horror, or fantasy novel (tellingly, Simmons has written all three). They’re also really hard to classify in terms of subgenre. At the beginning, I felt like I was reading a space opera written before cyberpunk or new wave had much influence. As we learn more about the world of Hyperion, it keeps changing, introducing new space opera, religious sf, and cyberpunk tropes. Simmons weaves these subgenres together in Hyperion by structuring the novel after Canterbury Tales. Seven pilgrims on a journey take turns telling their stories, each of which is wildly different in tone and structure, with the planet of Hyperion and its mysterious, murderous denizen, the Shrike, as the gravitational center they all revolve around.

The Fall of Hyperion - Hyperion Cantos Wiki - Wikia

Review: The Fall of Hyperion by Dan Simmons - Eyrie

I’d never heard of Dan Simmons before and I have no idea why. Hyperion and The Fall of Hyperion are very unique, both in setting and structure. Simmons accomplishes this by blending together a lot of disparate elements. Although they’re ostensibly sf, sometimes it’s hard to tell whether I’m reading an sf, horror, or fantasy novel (tellingly, Simmons has written all three). They’re also really hard to classify in terms of subgenre. At the beginning, I felt like I was reading a space opera written before cyberpunk or new wave had much influence. As we learn more about the world of Hyperion, it keeps changing, introducing new space opera, religious sf, and cyberpunk tropes. Simmons weaves these subgenres together in Hyperion by structuring the novel after Canterbury Tales. Seven pilgrims on a journey take turns telling their stories, each of which is wildly different in tone and structure, with the planet of Hyperion and its mysterious, murderous denizen, the Shrike, as the gravitational center they all revolve around.

Although the first in the series, Hyperion, had better structure and was told better, I liked The Fall of Hyperion more. Its like the reverse of A New Hope and The Empire Stikes Back, in that in the Hyperion Cantos, the horror comes before the hope. I loved the continuing literary alliterations and the exploration of the human spirit through voice. I particularly liked the koans of Ummon, which reminded me of the highly influential Modernist wave of poetry- such as Ezra Pound, with maybe even a snippet of E.E. Cummings. The voice of Ummon also reminded me of the voices of the dolphins from the first Hyperion Cantos. Here I go rambling. Overall, I loved this book and highly recommend it.