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Parsons The New School For Design

The New School: How the Information Age Will Save American Education from Itself

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Parsons The New School For Design

The New School's curriculum is highly experimental and avant-garde, offering classes such as: "Heterodox Identities," "Games 101," "NYC: Graphic Gotham," "Punk & Noise," "Masculinity in Asia," "Queer Culture," and "Play and Toil in the Digital Sweatshop." The New School also offers a course titled "Social Media: The Power to Speak the Truth." The course explores the transformative history of the Internet and provides a working knowledge of the tools it offers for journalism and public action.

First established as the Chase School, the institution was founded in 1896 by the American impressionist painter (1849–1916). Chase led a small group of Progressives who seceded from the in search of a more free, more dramatic, and more individual expression of art. The Chase School changed its name in 1898 to the New York School of Art.

Parsons The New School For Design

Major Schools Founded
The New School for Social Research 1937
Parsons School of Design 1896
Eugene Lang College of Liberal Arts 1978
Mannes School of Music 1916
School of Jazz 1986
School of Drama 2005
Schools of Public Engagement 2011
Former Divisions
The New School for General Studies 1919–2011
Milano The New School for Management and Urban Policy 1964–2011
The Actors Studio Drama School 1994–2005

Parsons The New School For Design

Unlike most U.S. universities, The New School has a "student-directed curriculum", which does not require its undergraduates to take general education courses. Instead, students are encouraged to explore before focusing on a major, selecting topics that are of interest to them. Although all "New Schoolers" are required to complete rigorous core training—usually of a literary, conservatory, or artistic nature—students are expected to be the primary designer of their own individualized and eclectic education.

The university offers 81 degree/diploma programs and majors, with a student-to-faculty ratio of 9:1. This small class size allows The New School to teach most of its classes in the seminar style—especially at Eugene Lang College, which consistently ranks at the top of The Princeton Review's "class discussions encouraged" national listing.