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To Sir, With Love

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Glee - To Sir With Love (Acapella)

"To Sir With Love" was initially recorded by (with , who also acted in the film). It was released as a single in the United States in 1967 and in October reached No. 1 on the , where it remained for five weeks. The single ranked No. 1 in Billboard's year-end chart, though ' "", which debuted in December 1966 and spent most of its chart life in 1967, was the overall bigger hit. Canada's put the song at No. 2 for the year 1967. "To Sir with Love" has the distinction of being the only record by a British artist to reach No. 1 on the US charts while not charting in the , where it appeared only as a B-side to "Let's Pretend" (released in the UK on 23 June 1967), which reached No. 11 on the .

"To Sir With Love" is the theme from 's 1967 film . The song was written by and (husband of Lulu's longtime manager ). produced the record, with arranging and conducting. In her recording, Lulu makes notable use of .

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Lulu - Miscellaneous Album Lyrics
1.To Sir With Love
2.Boom Bang A Bang
3.The Man With The Golden Gun
4.Love Song
5.Marley Purt Drive
6.Melody Fair
7.Good Day Sunshine (Single Version)
8.Dirty Old Man

To Sir With Love (song) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A. Okay. Well, I was musical director for Mickie Most. That was probably the most productive time. That was arranging and playing for Herman's Hermits, Donovan, Lulu. I did "To Sir With Love." Herman's Hermit, I did "A Kind of Hush," "No Milk Today." Donovan, I did "Hurdy Gurdy Man," "Mellow Yellow," all those arrangements. I'm playing on them, too.

You remember the film, of course. Sidney Poitier tames an unruly bunch of Swinging Sixties East London teenagers and Lulu sings “To Sir With Love” to him at the end of term disco. Possibly you don’t remember the original book, the semi-autobiographical work of E R Braithwaite (who, aged 101, attended the Northampton press night all the way from his home in New York), about the erudite and suave West Indian immigrant, Ricky Braithwaite, and his experience of school teaching under an experimentally liberal headmaster.