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Aslan Asker Svayk: Yaroslav Hasek ..

Aslan Asker Svayk

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Jaroslav Hasek (I) (1883–1923) Writer

Ohel performance of the theatrical adaptation of Yaroslav Hasek’s Good Soldier Schweik. Some of the critics had reservations about presenting a play that satirizes heroism and patriotism “just several days after the invasion of Poland by the Nazi army, which marks the beginning of World War II.”

At the lower end, do not pass up Yaroslav Hasek, Schweik, the Good Soldier, a great work filled with satire and a classic in its own right. Supposedly inspired Heller to write Catch 22.

Category:Jaroslav Hašek - Wikimedia Commons

Jaroslav Halák - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Be that as it may, the echoes of the war and of the pre-war events of the 1930s reverberated not only in the contents and the messages of the plays that were published or performed in this period, but also in the responses and references to the topical aspect that emerged from them. Thus, for instance, in June 1936 a literary trial was held in Tel-Aviv concerning Leopold Yessner's controversial theatrical interpretation of Shakespeare's The judges, as well as the stage director, who was the "defendant" in this case, were of the opinion that, under the given circumstances, with anti-Semitism on the rise and the imminence of the war, it was particularly important to present Shylock as a Jew who "accentuates his moral stature . . . in contradistinction to the defective morality and the hypocrisy of his persecutors." Similar criticism, though from a different direction, accompanied the Ohel performance of the theatrical adaptation of Yaroslav Hasek's Some of the critics had reservations about presenting a play that satirizes heroism and patriotism "just several days after the invasion of Poland by the Nazi army, which marks the beginning of World War II." In September 1942, the Habimah Theater introduced Aharon Ashman's [This Land] a play that portrayed the heroism and self-sacrifice of the founders and first settlers of the town of Hadera in celebration of its 50th anniversary. This theatrical event coincided with the actual battles that were raging in the Syrian Desert and the threat of the anticipated invasion of...

Be that as it may, the echoes of the war and of the pre-war events of the 1930s reverberated not only in the contents and the messages of the plays that were published or performed in this period, but also in the responses and references to the topical aspect that emerged from them. Thus, for instance, in June 1936 a literary trial was held in Tel-Aviv concerning Leopold Yessner's controversial theatrical interpretation of Shakespeare's The judges, as well as the stage director, who was the "defendant" in this case, were of the opinion that, under the given circumstances, with anti-Semitism on the rise and the imminence of the war, it was particularly important to present Shylock as a Jew who "accentuates his moral stature . . . in contradistinction to the defective morality and the hypocrisy of his persecutors." Similar criticism, though from a different direction, accompanied the Ohel performance of the theatrical adaptation of Yaroslav Hasek's Some of the critics had reservations about presenting a play that satirizes heroism and patriotism "just several days after the invasion of Poland by the Nazi army, which marks the beginning of World War II." In September 1942, the Habimah Theater introduced Aharon Ashman's [This Land] a play that portrayed the heroism and self-sacrifice of the founders and first settlers of the town of Hadera in celebration of its 50th anniversary. This theatrical event coincided with the actual battles that were raging in the Syrian Desert and the threat of the anticipated invasion of...