Home

Zeeya Merali is a writer in London.

Visualizing Earth Science

$35.47


Zeeya Merali | Social Trends Institute

Many researchers believe that physics will not be complete until it can explain not just the behaviour of space and time, but where these entities come from.

Zeeya Merali

Tollaksen and his group, says Discover writer Zeeya Merali, are “looking into the notion that time might flow backward, allowing the future to influence the past. By extension, the universe might have a destiny that reaches back and conspires with the past to bring the present into view. On a cosmic scale, this idea could help explain how life arose in the universe against tremendous odds. On a personal scale, it may make us question whether fate is pulling us inexorably forward and whether we have free will.” The article says that because of its usefulness, the Chapman group’s work is gaining ground and acceptance from many other physicists. The number of derivative research papers in mainstream journals (Nature, Science, etc) is exploding rapidly.

Zeeya Merali - Discover Magazine

  • In the popular science section called Nature News and Comment, Zeeya Merali wrote a piece suggesting that Stephen Hawking is now claiming that black holes do not exist. She even makes it appear as if she is directly quoting Hawking. In reality, that is a quote out of context. The paper in question merely suggest revising the mainstream account of the event horizon into an “apparent horizon” to make the entities more consonant with quantum mechanics. This story was also carried wrongly on a number of news outlets and presumably her article contributed to it.
  • Stories by Zeeya Merali - Scientific American

    One of the main problems with the Big Bang is that the temperature of the universe is nearly uniform. If a “big bang” event had created the universe, then according to some explanations, there hasn’t been enough time between then and now for it to have reached that temperature equilibrium. Here’s Zeeya Merali writing for Nature News:

    Tollaksen and his group, says Discover writer Zeeya Merali, are “looking into the notion that time might flow backward, allowing the future to influence the past. By extension, the universe might have a destiny that reaches back and conspires with the past to bring the present into view. On a cosmic scale, this idea could help explain how life arose in the universe against tremendous odds. On a personal scale, it may make us question whether fate is pulling us inexorably forward and whether we have free will.” The article says that because of its usefulness, the Chapman group’s work is gaining ground and acceptance from many other physicists. The number of derivative research papers in mainstream journals (Nature, Science, etc) is exploding rapidly.